Stanford study on brain waves shows how different teaching methods affect reading development

Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss found that beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading.

Beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, instead of trying to learn whole words, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading, according to new Stanford research investigating how the brain responds to different types of reading instruction.

In other words, to develop reading skills, teaching students to sound out “C-A-T” sparks more optimal brain circuitry than instructing them to memorize the word “cat.” And, the study found, these teaching-induced differences show up even on future encounters with the word.

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/may/reading-brain-phonics-052815.html

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About ogmsl

Fellow with the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators (AOGPE). I have a Masters Degree in Education from OISE/University of Toronto and am a certified Ontario teacher. Family connection with dyslexia. Past President of ONBIDA - Ontario Branch of International Dyslexia Association. In Private practice working with students of all ages and also teacher training.
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